K A S H R U T . C O M©

The Premier Kosher Information Source on the Internet


HOME | PASSOVER | CONSUMER | COMMERCIAL | TRAVEL | ZEMANIM | LINKS | ARTICLES | RECIPES | HUMOR | E-MAIL LIST

Subscribe to get e-mail when this site is updated
for from
to
 
Shop Artscroll and support Kashrut.com
 

Food News


THIS SECTION IS FOR NEWS AND INTERESTING STORIES RELATED TO FOOD, NUTRITION AND FOOD PROCESSING. THEY ARE NOT NECESSARILY RELATED TO KOSHER BUT MAY BE OF INTEREST TO THE KOSHER CONSUMER, MANUFACTURER OR MASHGIACH.

Do Plastic Bag Bans Make A Difference?

July 22, 2019 - from Anthropocene Magazine:

"First, the Good News. Cities that have banned consumer plastic bags have seen a decrease in the number of bags found in nature. Abandoned bags are not only an eyesore, they are also detrimental to birds, fish, and other fauna as the bags make their way from cities to oceans—and we definitely don’t need to add to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch."

"Now, the Bad News. Despite the local clean-up factor, the environmental benefits of banning plastic bags remain to be seen. A recent life-cycle study from CIRAIG looked at the consequences of banning conventional, single-use, consumer plastic bags (made of high-density polyethylene) from the city of Montreal. The results challenged the conventional understanding of banning these bags."

"Results showed that all replacement bags had higher indicator scores for impacts on human health, ecosystem quality, and fossil-fuel depletion. Therefore, by definition, only reusable bags have the potential to be an advantageous switch from single-use consumer plastic bags—and that potential is realized only by reusing the bags many times: as frequently as 9,400 times for cotton bags or a more reasonable 102 times for unwoven polypropylene bags.

The Unintended Consequences: It turns out that those much-maligned conventional plastic bags have very high reuse rates (as much as 77.7 percent), mostly as garbage-bin liners. When they are banned, people buy more conventional, polyethylene garbage bags. And there’s the kicker. While it was already difficult for reusable bags to be advantageous over the banned plastic bags, in this scenario, even if you reuse your reusable bags an infinite number of times, the impacts of using more garbage bags drown out the advantageous environmental effects.

Why: The conventional plastic bag was designed for a single use—it is thin and light, and its life cycle requires little material and energy. Moreover, its reuse as a garbage bag at the end of its life significantly reduces its potential impacts in comparison to the other types of bag, whose material and energy requirements are much higher."

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W925

The information posted is from secondary sources. We cannot take responsibility for the accuracy of the information.
Comments to webmaster@kashrut.com 
© Copyright 2019 Scharf Associates
Phone: (781)784-6890 
E-mail: ajms@kashrut.com
URL: " http://www.kashrut.com/"
 
Arlene J. Mathes-Scharf  
Food Scientist - Kosher Food Specialist
 
Scharf Associates
P.O. Box 50
Sharon, MA 02067