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Food News


THIS SECTION IS FOR NEWS AND INTERESTING STORIES RELATED TO FOOD, NUTRITION AND FOOD PROCESSING. THEY ARE NOT NECESSARILY RELATED TO KOSHER BUT MAY BE OF INTEREST TO THE KOSHER CONSUMER, MANUFACTURER OR MASHGIACH.

Newer news

H-E-B Recalls Stainless Steel Cookware Due to Injury Hazard

January 28, 2016: The CPSC posted that H-E-B is recalling stainless steel cookware because the metal discs that cover the cookware’s rivets can pop off and hit consumers, posing an injury hazard.
This recalls includes the Connect by H-E-B tri-ply stainless steel cookware. It was sold as a 12-piece set or as individual pieces. "Connect" is stamped into the base of the handle and the Connect by H-E-B logo is stamped on the underside of the cookware. Cookware included in this recall does not have a date code on the underside. The UPC code can be found on the back of the product packaging:

>Product Name UPC
Connect by H-E-B  8in Tri Ply Stainless Steel Fry Pan 4122032279
Connect by H-E-B 12Pc Cookware Set  Tri Ply Stainless Steel 4122032277
Connect by H-E-B 10in Tri Ply Stainless Steel Fry Pan 4122032280
Connect by H-E-B 12in Deep Sauté w/Lid & Handle 4122032297
Connect by H-E-B 10in Tri Ply Non-Stick  Stainless Steel Fry Pan 4122032281

Connect by H-E-B 8in Tri Ply Non-Stick  Stainless Steel Fry Pan

4122032283
Connect by H-E-B 6Qt Dutch Oven 4122032293
Connect by H-E-B 12in Tri Ply Non-Stick  Stainless Steel Fry Pan w/handle 4122032290
Connect by H-E-B 12Qt Stock Pot w/Lid 4122032296

Connect by H-E-B 12in Tri Ply Stainless Steel Fry Pan w/handle 4122032286

The firm has received seven reports of the metal discs popping off the cookware. No injuries have been reported.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled cookware and return it to H-E-B for a full refund.  


Sold exclusively at H-E-B stores in Texas from September 2014 through December 2015 for between $20 and $250.
Manufacturer(s) HEB Grocery Company LLC, of San Antonio, Texas


Consumer Contact: H-E-B at 800-432-3113 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday or online at www.heb.com and click on Product Recalls under the Customer Service section at the bottom of the homepage for more information.

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W398

Safety Risks Are Higher with Food Imported from Low-GDP Nations

A study by the FDA of 10 year's of food import violations found that food imported into the US from countries with a low GDP. "'The size of a country's economy appears to be a more important determinant of food safety than its wealth,' or GDP per capita." "The researchers kept in mind that high-GDP countries may be better able to reduce risks through standards and regulations. As a result, importers may wish to pay more for products from high-GDP countries or work more closely with suppliers from low-GDP countries to ensure good safety practices."

The preceeding news is from the specialtyfood.com and bizjournals.com on January 27, 2016 .

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W396

Interesting Tidbits about TuBishvat

"The original spirit of Tu Bishvat""is planting trees in the land of Israel and eating their fruits." The custom of planting trees on Tu Bishvat is 126 years old, started by Ze’ev Ya’abetz who was the rabbi of Zichron Ya’akiv colony on the Carmel Mountains. He had the idea of having his students plant trees on Tu Bishvat. This idea spread.
The Israeli Fruit Growers association suggests that eating fresh fruit on Tu Bishvat is more in the spirit of TuBishvat. The custom of eating dried fruits started in Europe, where people did not have access to fresh fruit.

The preceeding news is from the JewishPress on January 25, 2016 .

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W394

This is an interesting article on how to keep produce fresh. They suggest to keep aspargus in water like cut flowers in the refrigerator, keep a dry paper towel with lettuce, coat avocado with lime or lemon juice to prevent oxidation, keep bananas bunched in the refrigerator to reduce ripening, keep tomatoes in the warmest part of the refrigerator, keep berrries out of the crisper so they can breathe and put potatoes in a brown paper bag and store in a cool place but not the refrigerator.
More information at usnews: 8 Genius Hacks to Keep Your Produce From Going Bad.

posted on January 25, 2016 .

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W395

The following news is from the FoodNavigator on January 20, 2015 .

The Dutch food safety authority released a list of 1800 companies that were customers of the company that was found to that may have been contaminated with horsemeat.

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W392

The following information is from the USDA and the IFT posted on January 20, 2015 .

"The U.S. Dept. of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) has posted data from the 2014 Pesticide Data Program (PDP) Annual Summary, which confirms that overall pesticide chemical residues found on the foods tested are at levels below the tolerances established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and do not pose a safety concern." "99% of the products sampled through PDP had residues below the EPA tolerances." Only 0.36% of the samples tested had residues exceeding the EPA tolernances. "n 2014, the USDA tested for pesticides in 10,619 samples of food, including 8,582 samples of fruits and vegetables; 314 samples of oats; 314 samples of rice; 1,055 samples of infant formula; and 354 samples of salmon. Domestic samples accounted for 75.5% the samples while 22.9% were imports, 0.7% were of mixed origin, and 0.9% were of unknown origin." "The PDP generally confirms the U.S. food supply is safe with respect to pesticide chemical residues."

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W393

The following news is from the FoodSafetynews on January 19, 2015 .

A pilot project was started to teach deli operators the proper way to handle food, clean and sanitize to prevent Listeria monocytogenes. A previous study had found that more than a third of delis did not know what to do. Deli's who underwent training had a much higher compliance.

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W391

The following news is from the Linked-in and HalalNews posted on January 20, 2015 .

"The French government confirms the legality of ritual slaughter Responding to a question from a member, the Ministry of Agriculture recalled on January 5 that ritual slaughter, directed by Jews and Muslims without stunning the animal, was legal and consistent with secularism. Indeed, Jews believe that meat is not kosher if the animal was stunned before bleeding." "The text recalls that the derogation from the obligation to stun animals, "under the free exercise of religion" is framed by the French and European law and that this possibility 'does not undermine secularism.'"
"In its response, the Department states that 'slaughter without stunning may be made after immobilization of the animal and respecting all the measures stipulated by the regulations on animal protection and food safety'."

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W385

The following product safety alert is from the CPSC on January 19, 2016.

West Elm Recalls Bar Stools Due to Fall Hazard; Sold Exclusively at West Elm

West Elm, a division of Williams-Sonoma, Inc., of San Francisco has recalled Saddle bar and counter stools because the legs on the stools can break, posing a fall hazard.
The Saddle bar and counter stools have solid wood legs with a pecan-stained finish and were sold in four upholstery options: elephant leather, crosshatch steel/ivory, slate chevron and iron basketweave. The seat height for the bar stools is 30.5 inches with overall dimensions of 20.5 inches wide by 20 inches deep by 41 inches tall. The seat height for the counter stools is 26 inches with overall dimensions of 20.5 inches wide by 20 inches deep by 37.5 inches high. SKU numbers are located on the box of the product, the customer receipt and on a sticker on the bottom of the seat. Recalled SKU numbers are:

SKU

Type

Color

652164

Counter Stool

Elephant Leather

655472

Bar Stool

Elephant Leather

1220763

Bar Stool

Iron Basketweave

1235506

Bar Stool

Iron Basketweave

1425487

Counter Stool

Iron Basketweave

1591601

Counter Stool

Iron Basketweave

1699289

Counter Stool

Slate Chevron

1700749

Bar Stool

Slate Chevron

1795665

Bar Stool

Slate Chevron

1795566

Counter Stool

Slate Chevron

4737185

Bar Stool

Elephant Leather

4737318

Counter Stool

Elephant Leather

8447229

Counter Stool

Crosshatch Steel/Ivory

8447476

Bar Stool

Crosshatch Steel/Ivory

9082843

Bar Stool

Crosshatch Steel/Ivory

9087271

Counter Stool

Crosshatch Steel/Ivory


The firm has received six reports of the stools breaking, including one injury. 

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled stools and contact West Elm for information on returning the stools for a full refund. West Elm is contacting known customers directly.


Sold at West Elm stores, online at www.westelm.com and the West Elm catalogue nationwide from July 2013 through November 2015 for between $370 and $500 for single stools and between $740 and $1,000 for a set of two.

Consumer Contact: West Elm toll-free at 844-824-8911 from 7 a.m. to midnight ET daily or online at www.westelm.com and click on “Safety Recalls” under the “About Us” at the bottom of the page.

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W389

The following product safety alert is from the FoodManufacturing.com dated January 15, 2016.

The FDA ruled that a potato that was genetically engineered to resist the late blight that caused the Irish potato famine, reduce bruising and produce less acrylamide when cooked at at high temperature is as safe as any other potato on the market. The EPA still needs to approve the product.

The previous item can be cited with the URL: http://www.kashrut.com/News/?alert=W388
Older news

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